The Haunted Manor House

Walking through the old, dark house
Sue heard a floorboard creak.
Another sound then startled her.
“Who’s there? Did someone speak?”

She entered the oak dining hall
Peering into the gloom –
A figure loomed before her!
Suits of armour filled the room. (Phew!)

Gothic plate armour. Photo credit: en.wikipedia.org

Gothic plate armour.
Photo credit: en.wikipedia.org

As she moved into the lounge
A clang behind her told her
One of the suits was moving!
The temperature was colder.

She looked behind her, nervously
But couldn’t see the armour
“There’s an explanation,” she told herself,
Took a deep breath and felt calmer.

She spun around suddenly
As something touched her shoulder.
She was down-to-earth and logical –
More like Scully than Mulder,

Yet she was feeling very scared
Because nothing was there!
Panic rose up inside her;
Something brushed against her hair.

She screamed – ear-piercing, high and shrill,
Shattering the silence,
And tried to run to the front door
To escape this house of violence.

Two people had been murdered here
Three hundred years ago.
The Lord of the Manor had repeatedly stabbed
His estranged wife and her new beau.

As she ran to the front door
Susan looked back and saw
A figure floating after her
Followed by one more –

Dressed in 18th century clothes
But glowing were this pair.
Sue wished she’d stayed at home
And hadn’t taken on the dare

Of staying in this house, alone,
She’d thought it wasn’t true
That ghosts really existed.
The pair came near and went “BOO”!

She screamed again and tried to turn
The handle on the door
It didn’t work, her knees sagged
And she fell down to the floor.

She sobbed hysterically.
The ghostly woman said “Don’t cry.
We always frighten people,
There’s no escape so do not try.”

Then, suddenly, more ghosts appeared
Behind the glowing pair.
They moaned and wailed loudly
As they floated in the air.

“You’re here, my dear, forever,”
Said the ghost lady to Sue.
“You fell right through the rotten floor
And now you’re a ghost too!”

Brown lady of Raynham Hall. Taken from en.wikipedia.org. Photo credit: Captain Hubert C. Provand.  First published in Country Life magazine, 1936.

Brown lady of Raynham Hall.
Taken from en.wikipedia.org.
Photo credit: Captain Hubert C. Provand.
First published in Country Life magazine, 1936.

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